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Weekly Lost Chronicles: Most Emotional Moments

January 20, 2010

With the start of the series finale of Lost only a few weeks away, we’re taking a look back through some of the more memorable moments during its run. Lost’s characters are so well written and developed, the line between actor and role are almost non-existent, making each heart string pulling moment much heavier. Here’s a few moments that had me in a tear or two (I’ll never reveal how many).

Charlie’s Greatest Hits: Desmond’s ability to see into the future had enabled him to become the variable that kept Charlie alive. Desmond then presented Charlie with his choice: Not do anything and live, or swim to the underwater station “Looking Glass” and enter the codes that would break the jamming signal. Charlie would have to die in the process, yet would enable his love, Claire, and her newborn, Aaron, to get off the island safely. Throughout the episode Charlie wrote down, while the show flashed back, to what he considered the “five best moments of my sorry excuse for a life. My greatest hits.” While on the boat nearing the Looking Glass site, he wrote down his greatest hit, “The Night I Met You” and asked Desmond to give the letter to Claire. I had actually pleaded with my TV, “Charlie, you don’t have to do this” while holding back what could have been a flood of tears. I almost got up and walked away. Never has a network television program done that to me.

Hurley, The Microbus, and The Curse: Hurley was convinced that his winning lottery numbers were a curse. Everything bad that could have possibly happened, from his brand new house catching fire to a meteor hitting his brand new fast food restaurant, seemed to transpire. Determined to break his bad luck streak, Hurley set his sights on kick-starting a dead, Dharma VW Microbus by popping the clutch as it rolled down a fairly steep hill. In Hurley’s leap of faith (Charlie riding shotgun, Sawyer and Jin pushing the bus), he closed his eyes, repeated “there is no curse, you make your own luck” and jump started the engine moments before hitting the rocks. Making this scene more memorable was the 8-track tape that began blasting Three Dog Night‘s “Shambala” as the microbus’ engine turned over. The final moments of that sequence still hit home: Hurley sitting in the driver’s seat, his curse broken; Charlie coming back to Claire; Jin handing a single rose to Sun . . .  Sawyer came back to nobody, while a violin instrumental of “Shambala” provided a moving soundtrack. It was a scene repeated often, watching the rest of the survivors welcoming their own back.

Desmond’s “Constant”: Desmond had been flashing between 1996 and 2004, his ability to remember the people around him gone, slowly dying due to the stress on his brain. Daniel Faraday’s remedy was for Desmond to find a constant, someone in past and current times that he cared about. Desmond’s constant was his former girlfriend, Penny. During his flashback to 1996, the couple already broken up, Desmond pleads with Penny to give him her phone number, insisting he’ll need it 8 years from then. It was the emotional, future phone call from the freighter that gave this episode its gravity. The quick flashes between the ship and Penny’s home, promises to find one another and never leave, the words “I love you” spoken simultaneously before the ship’s phone loses its power–all were enough to make your heart explode. The warmth came from watching the 1996 Desmond outside of Penny’s apartment, smiling as the 2004 Desmond placed his call, knowing one day he would have her love once again.

Hurley Buries Libby: Michael accidentally shooting Hurley’s new girlfriend Libby as she was getting their picnic blankets was one of the more disturbing moments of the series. Hurley being the huge, lovable oaf that he is, you couldn’t help but feel for him. The big emotional moment was when Hurley visited a barely conscious Libby in the hatch, shortly before her passing away. Kneeling at her bedside, holding back tears, all he could get out was, “Hey, it’s me. Hurley. Hugo.” And then he started to lose it, twice saying, “I’m sorry I forgot the blankets.” Jack, not exactly known for his bedside manner as a doctor, couldn’t help but look down and then away as Hurley seemed to accept the blame for Libby’s death. I still hold a few tears back thinking about that scene.

Jack Revives Charlie: Charlie had been found unconscious, hanging from a tree with a sack covering his head. Jack had proceeded perform CPR, breathing into Charlie’s mouth and pounding on his chest, Kate standing back and watching. The longer it went on, the more fruitless it seemed. Jack remained determined to save Charlie’s life. A man possessed, Jack began beating on Charlie’s chest, harder and harder, screaming at Charlie to wake up as Kate begged him to stop. The scene went on long enough, making it brutal for a lot of us to watch. Kate seemed to emphasize that very point, turning her back on what was happening and openly crying. Only when it seemed that all hope was lost did Charlie come back to life. Whether it was really Jack who saved Charlie or the island might still be a question left to answer.

End of Season One/Opening The Hatch: It was one of the most subtle, yet moving moments of the first season. After a season long introduction, we’re left with two lasting images. That slow motion camera pan across the beach, each character going about their lives, Michael Giacchino’s soft score in the background, it was a look into each character’s predicament, as well as the reality that they may, indeed, have to learn how to live with each other for the rest of their lives. Friendships would need to be forged, each would have to learn the other’s strengths and weaknesses in order to survive. The final image of that season was of a blown open hatch, the camera looking up at both Jack and Locke, each man staring down into his own destiny.

If you weren’t hooked by then, nothing else would ever do it.

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